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Technical Briefs

Effect of Spinal Level and Loading Conditions on the Production of Vertebral Burst Fractures in a Porcine Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Dominic Boisclair

 Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, 5400 Gouin Blvd., West Montreal, Quebec H4J 1C5, Canada; Department of Mechanical Engineering, École de technologie supérieure, 1100 Notre-Dame St., West Montreal, Quebec H3C 1K3, Canadadominicboisclair@hotmail.com

Jean-Marc Mac-Thiong

Stefan Parent

 Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, 5400 Gouin Blvd., West Montreal, Quebec H4J 1C5, Canada; Department of Surgery, Université de Montréal, 2900 Édouard-Montpetit Blvd., Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J5, Canadastefan.parent@umontreal.ca

Yvan Petit

 Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, 5400 Gouin Blvd., West Montreal, Quebec H4J 1C5, Canada; Department of Mechanical Engineering, École de technologie supérieure, 1100 Notre-Dame St., West Montreal, Quebec H3C 1K3, Canadayvan.petit@etsmtl.ca

J Biomech Eng 133(9), 094503 (Oct 04, 2011) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004917 History: Received February 28, 2011; Accepted August 17, 2011; Published October 04, 2011; Online October 04, 2011

Vertebral burst fractures are commonly studied with experimental animal models. There is however a lack of consensus as to what parameters are important to create an unstable burst fracture with a significant canal encroachment on such model. This study aims to assess the effect of the loading rate, flexion angle, spinal level, and their interactions on the production of a vertebral thoracolumbar burst fracture on a porcine model. Sixteen functional spinal units composed of three vertebrae were harvested from mature Yucatan minipigs. Two loading rates (0.01 and 500 mm/s), two flexion angles (0° and 15°), and two spinal levels (T11-T13 and T14-L2) were studied, following a full factorial experimental plan with one repetition. Compression was applied to each functional unit to create a vertebral fracture. The load-to-failure, loss of compressive stiffness, final canal encroachment, and fracture type were used as criteria to evaluate the resulting fracture. All specimens compressed without flexion resulted in burst fractures. Half of the specimens compressed with the 15° flexion angle resulted in compression fractures. Specimens positioned without flexion lost more of their compressive stiffness and had more significant canal encroachment. Fractured units compressed with a higher loading rate resulted in a greater loss of compressive stiffness. The spinal level had no significant effect on the resulting fractures. The main parameters which affect the resulting fracture are the loading rate and the flexion angle. A higher loading rate and the absence of flexion favors the production of burst fractures with a greater canal encroachment.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

FSU position and loading direction. Aluminum frames (A), polyester resin (B), and wedge-shaped aluminum pieces (C) are identified. Soft tissues are not illustrated for clarity.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Typical experimental compression fracture on the left image and burst fracture on the right

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