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Technical Briefs

An Argument for the Use of Multiple Segment Stents in Curved Arteries

[+] Author and Article Information
Saeid Kasiri1

Trinity Centre for Bioengineering,  University of Dublin, Parsons Building, College Green, Dublin 2, Irelandkasirigs@tcd.ie

Daniel J. Kelly

Trinity Centre for Bioengineering,  University of Dublin, Parsons Building, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 133(8), 084501 (Sep 15, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004863 History: Received February 01, 2011; Accepted August 03, 2011; Published September 15, 2011; Online September 15, 2011

Stenting of curved arteries is generally perceived to be more challenging than straight vessels. Conceptually implanting multiple shorter stents rather than a single longer stent into such a curved artery represents a promising concept, but little is known about the impact of such an approach. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of using a multiple segment stent rather than a single long stent to dilate a curved artery using the finite element method. A double segment stent (DSS) and a single segment stent (SSS) were modeled. The stents were compared when expanded into a model of a curved artery. The model predicts that the DSS provides higher flexibility, more conformity, and lower recoil in comparison to the SSS. The volume of arterial tissue experiencing high levels of stress due to stent implantation is also reduced for the DSS. It is suggested that a multiple segment stenting system is a potential solution to the problem of higher rates of in-stent restenosis in curved arteries and mechanically challenging environments.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: stents , Stress
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Geometry model of (top left) unreformed curved artery, (middle left) DSS on the balloon and (bottom left) SSS on balloon. (right) Angle of artery curve, Changes in the angle shows the level of straightening due to stenting.

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Figure 2

Distribution of Von Mises stress in different layers of artery after recoil of expanded SSS. (a) Stent recoiled in the curved artery, (b) intima layer, (c) media, and (d) adventitia.

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Figure 3

Distribution of Von Mises stress in different layers of artery after recoil when a DSS is implanted. (a) Stent recoiled in the curved artery, (b) intima layer, (c) Media, (d) adventitia.

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Figure 4

Comparing the Von-Mises stress on intima and media for two different types of stents

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Figure 5

Crush strength for the two types of stents

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