0
Research Papers

Determination of Passive Moment-Angle Relationships at the Trapeziometacarpal Joint

[+] Author and Article Information
Mathieu Domalain

Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Institut des Sciences du Mouvement, UMR 6233, Case postale 910, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09, Francemathieu.domalain@univmed.fr

Laurent Vigouroux, Eric Berton

Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Institut des Sciences du Mouvement, UMR 6233, Case postale 910, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09, France

J Biomech Eng 132(7), 071009 (May 26, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001397 History: Received September 02, 2009; Revised March 07, 2010; Posted March 11, 2010; Published May 26, 2010; Online May 26, 2010

While modeling the trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint for determination of tendon forces, the TMC has been considered frictionless and passive moments created by soft tissues neglected. This, however, becomes inaccurate when reaching the joint end range of motion and considering that the TMC is entirely crossed by a complex network of skin, ligaments, soft tissues, and tendons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the passive moments with respect to joint posture in order to further include this relationship in biomechanical modeling. An experimental method was proposed to estimate in vivo a global passive moment including the sum of the actions of each passive anatomical structure. An external force was applied at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint in various directions ranging from neutral position to full extension and full adduction to full abduction. The passive moment was computed and expressed as a function of the adopted joint angles. An exponential regression was then developed to fit the experimental data and to propose a generic passive moment model. Results showed a good agreement between the proposed exponential regression model and the experimental measures. Moreover, it was shown that joint stiffness could represent more than 60% of the net joint moment during a typical pulp grip task. These results showed the necessity to include the data in biomechanical modeling. The results may help predict more realistic tendons force especially in abduction/adduction muscles.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a) Passive abduction/adduction moment (MpA-A) with respect to both the angles of flexion/extension (φ) and abduction/adduction (θ). Angles are expressed relative to the maximal amplitude (0 deg corresponds thus to maximal extension and abduction). (b) The two dimensional graphic of (a) illustrates the MpA-A with respect to θ at four different angles of φ−φmax. Bold and light points correspond to experimental data and regression model outputs, respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

(a) Passive flexion/extension moment (MpF-E) with respect to both the angles of flexion/extension (φ) and abduction/adduction (θ). Angles are expressed relative to the maximal amplitude (0 deg corresponds thus to maximal extension and abduction). (b) The two dimensional graphic of (a) illustrates the MpF-E with respect to φ at four different angles of θ−θmax. Bold and light points correspond to experimental data and regression model outputs, respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Marker protocol for the computation of the TMC kinematics. Xdhp axis is defined with markers fixed along the third metacarpal. Ydhp is perpendicular to the plane defined by the four markers fixed on the hand dorsum. Zdhp is perpendicular to the plane (Xdhp-Ydhp). Rt placement is calculated from Rdhp according to Chao (2) and Rmc is defined by the triad markers orientation.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Experimental setup showing the arm and hand placement as well as the force application procedure. The sensor was embedded in the rod and the hand firmly fixed. Triad markers were fixed on the rod to define the force sensor orientation (white arrow).

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In