0
Technical Briefs

Dynamic Characterization of Human Breast Cancer Cells Using a Piezoresistive Microcantilever

[+] Author and Article Information
Sangjo Shim

Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 2SCR3 3003, South Campus Research Building two, 7435 Fanning Street, Houston, TX TX77054; Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 2SCR3 3003, South Campus Research Building two, 7435 Fanning Street, Houston, TX TX77054sangjoshim@mail.utexas.edu

Man Geun Kim

 LG Electronics, 16 Woomyeon-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul, 137-724, South Koreamangeun.kim@lge.com

Kyoungwoo Jo

Lighting Development Group, LG Innotek Co., Ltd., LG R&D Center, 533 Hogye-1-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do, 431-749, South Koreafarang001@dreamwiz.com

Yong Seok Kang

School of Life Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-712, South KoreaYongdol2@hanmail.net

Boreum Lee

Graduate-program of Medical System Eng. (GMSE), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500–712, South Korealeebr@gist.ac.kr

Sung Yang

School of Information and Mechatronics, Graduate-program of Medical System Eng. (GMSE), Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics,  Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, South Koreasyang@gist.ac.kr

Sang-Mo Shin

Graduate-Program of Medical System Eng. (GMSE), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500–712, South Koreasshin@gist.ac.kr

Jong-Hyun Lee1

School of Information and Mechatronics, Graduate-program of Medical System Eng. (GMSE), Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-712, South Koreajonghyun@gist.ac.kr

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 132(10), 104501 (Sep 10, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002180 History: Received January 16, 2010; Revised May 28, 2010; Posted July 15, 2010; Published September 10, 2010; Online September 10, 2010

In this paper, frequency response (dynamic compression and recovery) is suggested as a new physical marker to differentiate between breast cancer cells (MCF7) and normal cells (MCF10A). A single cell is placed on the laminated piezoelectric actuator and a piezoresistive microcantilever is placed on the upper surface of the cell at a specified preload displacement (or an equivalent force). The piezoelectric actuator excites the single cell in a sinusoidal fashion and its dynamic deformation is then evaluated from the displacement converted by measuring the voltage output through a piezoresistor in the microcantilever. The microcantilever has a flat contact surface with no sharp tip, making it possible to measure the overall properties of the cell rather than the local properties. These results indicate that the MCF7 cells are more deformable in quasi-static conditions compared with MCF10A cells, consistent with known characteristics. Under conditions of high frequency of over 50 Hz at a 1μm preload displacement, 1 Hz at a 2μm preload displacement, and all frequency ranges tested at a 3μm preload displacement, MCF7 cells showed smaller deformation than MCF10A cells. MCF7 cells have higher absorption than MCF10A cells such that MCF7 cells appear to have higher deformability according to increasing frequency. Moreover, larger preload and higher frequencies are shown to enhance the differences in cell deformability between the MCF7 cells and MCF10A cells, which can be used as a physical marker for differentiating between MCF10A cells and MCF7 cells, even for high-speed screening devices.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the experimental setup for measuring the frequency responses of MCF7 and MCF10A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Test chamber and microcantilever (top view). The microtube connected to a 1 ml syringe was installed on the glass substrate to supply the PBS solution containing the cells. Two piezoresistors are on the microcantilever. One piezoresistor detects the deflection of the microcantilever and the other is used to calibrate the temperature, playing a pivotal role as a reference.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Experimental setup for measuring the frequency responses (dynamic compression and recovery) of MCF7 and MCF10A. All instruments were set up on the optical table, which dampens the external vibration from the environment. The test chamber and the microcantilever were glued onto the PZT actuator and autopositioner, respectively, to precisely control the object positions.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Microcantilever and cells on the glass pedestal: (a) MCF7 and (b) MCF10A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Schematic illustrating the process of soft contact and preload displacement. (a) In no-contact mode, the piezoresistor sensor provides no output signal, as shown. (b) When approaching, the free end of the microcantilever initially makes contact with only the single cell and then the dc voltage level increases. (c) The free end was slightly lowered by 0.1 μm until the voltage output began to show sinusoidal oscillation. The soft contact begins by just showing a weak sinusoidal voltage output. (d) Preload displacements of 1 μm, 2 μm, and 3 μm are provided by the autopositioner for the microcantilever.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Two degree-of-freedom oscillatory system. This includes the oscillatory excitation by the PZT actuator, the dynamically deforming cells, and the microcantilever for sensing. This schematic illustrates the measuring system for a single cell and a microcantilever. Oscillatory displacement (Y1) generated by the PZT actuator deforms the selected single cell, which transfers the dynamic deformation to the free end of the microcantilever (Y2). The piezoresistor sensor transmits the voltage output (V2) to the oscilloscope.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Frequency responses by oscillatory displacement in terms of magnitudes (Y0=Y1−Y2) for MCF7 and MCF10A cells. The sinusoidal excitation and preload displacement affect the cell compression (Y0=Y1−Y2) of MCF7 and MCF10A cells. The oscillatory displacement is expressed as Y1 and the response of the free end of the microcantilever is expressed as Y2. Figs.  777 represent the magnitudes of the frequency responses. Figs.  777 show the enlarged view of the magnitudes of the frequency responses at a lower frequency range.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In