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Research Papers

A Model on Liquid Penetration Into Soft Material With Application to Needle-Free Jet Injection

[+] Author and Article Information
Kai Chen, Hua Zhou

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, 310018, Hangzhou, China

Ji Li

School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906

Gary J. Cheng1

School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906gjcheng@purdue.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 132(10), 101005 (Oct 01, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002487 History: Received July 24, 2009; Revised August 03, 2010; Posted September 01, 2010; Published October 01, 2010; Online October 01, 2010

A mathematical model has been presented for a high speed liquid jet penetration into soft solid by a needle-free injection system. The model consists of a cylindrical column formed by the initial jet penetration and an expansion sphere due to continuous deposition of the liquid. By solving the equations of energy conservation and volume conservation, the penetration depth and the radius of the expansion sphere can be predicted. As an example, the calculation results were presented for a typical needle-free injection system into which a silicon rubber was injected into. The calculation results were compared with the experimental results.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Process of jet penetration into the skin

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Figure 2

(a) Penetration of a soft solid punch by a flat punch and (b) state after removal

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Figure 3

Expansion of a solid cylindrical annulus caused by the penetration liquid: (a) original state and (b) expansion state

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Figure 4

Expansion of a solid spherical shell caused by the expansion of the deposit liquid: (a) original state and (b) expansion state

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Figure 5

The overall model

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Figure 6

Schema of stagnation pressure measurement

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Figure 7

A self-made jet injection system

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Figure 8

Jet velocity during impingement

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Figure 9

(pF/μ) versus (b/R) as constrained by Eq. 13

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Figure 10

The relationship between h and Rs(R=R′)

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Figure 11

Jet injected into silicon rubber (V=0.025 ml)

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Figure 12

Measured h and Rs versus W(V=0.0275 ml)

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Figure 13

Measured h and Rs versus V(W=0.14 J)

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Figure 14

Calculated h and Rs versus W (other parameters are fixed as J∥C=60.0 kJ/m2, μ=2.7 MPa, α=3.0, and V=0.0275 ml)

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Figure 15

Calculated h and Rs versus V (other parameters are fixed as J∥C=60.0 KJ/m2, μ=2.7 MPa, α=3.0, and W=0.14 J)

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Figure 16

Calculated h and Rs versus J∥C (other parameters are fixed as μ=2.7 MPa, α=3.0, V=0.0275 ml, and W=0.14 J)

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Figure 17

Calculated h and Rs versus μ (other parameters are fixed J∥C=60.0 kJ/m2, α=3.0, V=0.0275 ml, and W=0.14 J)

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