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Technical Briefs

Bone Resorption Induced by Fluid Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Lars Johansson1

Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Swedenlars.johansson@liu.se

Ulf Edlund

Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden

Anna Fahlgren, Per Aspenberg

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 131(9), 094505 (Aug 07, 2009) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3194756 History: Received February 12, 2008; Revised May 11, 2009; Published August 07, 2009

A model where bone resorption is driven by stimulus from fluid flow is developed and used as a basis for computer simulations, which are compared with experiments. Models for bone remodeling are usually based on the state of stress, strain, or energy density of the bone tissue as the stimulus for remodeling. We believe that there is experimental support for an additional pathway, where an increase in the amount of osteoclasts, and thus osteolysis, is caused by the time history of fluid flow velocity, fluid pressure, or other parameters related to fluid flow at the bone/soft tissue interface of the porosities in the bone.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Experimental setup

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Figure 2

Different phases in the porous bone and associated notation. V is an averaging volume, Vp is that part of V, which is pore volume, and Spb is the bone/porosity interface. Vp consists of soft tissue, Vst is an averaging volume at the soft tissue level, and Vf is the fluid channels therein. Sfst is the channel/soft tissue interface and n is the outward normal unit vector.

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Figure 3

Comparison of porosity distributions for fluid velocity (left) and pressure driven osteolysis (right). Plate modeled by no-flow boundary conditions.

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Figure 4

Cross section of a rat tibia after 14 days of pressurization, pressure applied to the area facing left

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Figure 5

Experimental porosity distributions: controls left, 5 day experiments middle, 14 day experiments right. Figures showing 8 or 9 overlayed specimens with one symmetry imposed, transversal view.

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Figure 6

Comparison of porosity distributions for fluid velocity (left) and pressure driven osteolysis (right). Plate modeled by zero pressure boundary conditions.

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