0
Technology Reviews

Frontiers in Biotransport: Water Transport and Hydration

[+] Author and Article Information
Alptekin Aksan, Allison Hubel

Center for Biotransport, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455

John C. Bischof1

Center for Biotransport, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455bischof@me.umn.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 131(7), 074004 (Jul 28, 2009) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3173281 History: Received November 04, 2008; Revised June 15, 2009; Published July 28, 2009

Biotransport, by its nature, is concerned with the motions of molecules in biological systems while water remains as the most important and the most commonly studied molecule across all disciplines. In this review, we focus on biopreservation and thermal therapies from the perspective of water, exploring how its molecular motions, properties, kinetic, and thermodynamic transitions govern biotransport phenomena and enable preservation or controlled destruction of biological systems.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Dynamics of protein denaturation. Adapted from Ref. 27.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Nuclear magnetic imaging of cryoprotectant (CPA) transport into tissues: (a) permeation images at times from 40 s to 30 min for a 50% v/v Me2SO in D2O solution in a freeze-dried tissue at 19°C. Light regions correspond to regions of high water concentration and dark regions high CPA solution concentrations (reprinted from (132) with permission from American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)); (b) X-ray tomographic measurement of the permeation of 8M glycerol DMEM solutions into bulk liver tissue (2 cm diameter cores) at 20°C and after freezing (same time of loading) to −196°C. CT contrast can be calibrated to glycerol permeation at 20°C and phase (ice versus amorphous) at −196°C (reprinted from (125) with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Confocal Raman spectroscopy of components of frozen (after high supercooling) 100 mg/ml TRE: 20 mg/ml LYS solution. Chemical composition (bright areas) can be selectively imaged to include (a) ice and (b) freeze-concentrated liquid (scale bar 6 μm). Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CH peak: 2810–2990 cm−1) of a single fibroblast: (c) live and (d) osmotically damaged (dead). (TRE—trehalose; LYS—lysozyme) (scale bar 2 μm, unpublished results).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Phalloidin stained rat hepatocytes incubated (a) on collagen film and (b) in collagen gel. The arrows in the images show the cells used in cytoplasmic viscosity measurements during osmotic stress application using the dye CCVJ (shown in the graphs below). The arrows in the graphs show the timepoint of osmotic stress application (unpublished results).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Imaging of ice formation in frozen liver tissue. (a) Ice formation in the vascular (sinusoid space–S) of slowly frozen rat liver (hepatocytes—H) by cryoscanning electron microscopy (reprinted from Ref. 110 with permission from Elsevier). (b) Ice formation in the vascular (sinusoid space—arrows) of slowly frozen rat liver freeze (hepatocytes—stars) by freeze-substitution microscopy (reprinted from Ref. 111 with kind permission from ASME) (scale bar 10 μm).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Overview of biomedical technologies impacted by biotransport and biothermodynamics

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In