0
Research Papers

Dynamics of Flow in a Mechanical Heart Valve: The Role of Leaflet Inertia and Leaflet Compliance

[+] Author and Article Information
Vasileios Gkanis1

Thermal Hydraulics and Multiphase Flow Laboratory, INT-RP, National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos,” Agia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens, Greecegkanis@ipta.demokritos.gr

Christos Housiadas

Thermal Hydraulics and Multiphase Flow Laboratory, INT-RP, National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos,” Agia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens, Greece

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 133(4), 041009 (Mar 23, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003673 History: Received October 05, 2010; Revised February 03, 2011; Posted February 18, 2011; Published March 23, 2011; Online March 23, 2011

In this work, we examine the dynamics of fluid flow in a mechanical heart valve when the solid inertia and leaflet compliance are important. The fluid is incompressible and Newtonian, and the leaflet is an incompressible neo-Hookean material. In the case of an inertialess leaflet, we find that the maximum valve opening angle and the time that the valve remains closed increase as the shear modulus of the leaflet decreases. More importantly, the regurgitant volume decreases with decreasing shear modulus. When we examined the forces exerted on the leaflet, we found that the downward motion of the leaflet is initiated by a vertical force exerted on its right side and, later on, by a vertical force exerted on the top side of the leaflet. In the case of solid inertia, we find that the maximum valve opening angle and the regurgitant volume are larger than in the case of an inertialess leaflet. These results highlight the importance of solid compliance in the dynamics of blood flow in a mechanical heart valve. More importantly, they indicate that mechanical heart valves with compliant leaflets may have smaller regurgitant volumes and smaller shear stresses than the ones with rigid leaflets.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the problem geometry. There is a gap between the leaflet and the left side of the sinus cavity. The length of this gap is 5×10−4H. The fluid enters from the left and exits from the right. From Gkanis and Housiadas (19).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Plot of flow rate at the channel entrance as a function of time. From Stijnen (15).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Plot of the valve opening angle versus time for different values of the shear modulus E. In the case of solid inertia, the shear modulus is E=108. The experimental results are from the work of Stijnen (15).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Plot of the valve flow versus time for different values of the shear modulus E. In the case of solid inertia, the shear modulus is E=108. In the inset, we zoom in on the time when back-flow occurs.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Schematic of the shape of the bottom side of the leaflet during valve opening and closing. The arrows indicate the time progress. These results are for the case of E=500.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Plot of circulation versus time

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Contours of dimensionless vorticity for the case of E=500 at the following instances: (a) peak flow, (b) average flow in deceleration, (c) peak reversed flow, (d) end of back-flow, and (e) average flow in acceleration

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Plot of absolute value of the maximum wall shear stress versus time

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Contours of dimensionless pressure for the case of E=500 at the following instances: (a) peak flow, (b) average flow in deceleration, (c) peak reversed flow, (d) end of back-flow, and (e) average flow in acceleration

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Force exerted on the leaflet sides in the x-direction

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Force exerted on the leaflet sides in the z-direction

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In