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Research Papers

Numerical Simulation of Mass Transport in a Microchannel Bioreactor With Cell Micropatterning

[+] Author and Article Information
Yan Zeng, Thong-See Lee, Peng Yu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576, Singapore

Hong-Tong Low1

Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576, Singaporempelowht@nus.edu.sg

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 130(3), 031018 (May 06, 2008) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2913231 History: Received January 29, 2007; Revised March 22, 2008; Published May 06, 2008

Micropatterning of two different cell types based on surface modification allows spatial control over two distinct cell subpopulations. This study considers a micropatterned coculture system, which has release and absorption parts alternately arranged at the base, and each part has a single cell type. A micropattern unit was defined and within each unit, there are one release part and one absorption part. The cells in the absorption parts consume species, which are secreted by the cells in the release parts. The species concentrations at the micropatterned cell base were computed from a three-dimensional numerical flow model incorporating mass transport. Different combined parameters were developed for the release and absorption parts to make the data collapse in each part. Combination of the collapse data in the release and absorption parts can be used to predict the concentration distribution through the whole channel. The correlated results were applied to predict the critical length ratio of the release and absorption parts for an actual micropatterned system (Bhatia, 1999, “Effect of Cell-Cell Interactions in Preservation of Cellular Phenotype: Co-Cultivation of Hepatocytes and Nonparenchymal Cell  ,” FASEB J.13, pp. 1883–1900) to avoid species insufficiency based on basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The mass transfer effectiveness was found to be higher with more numbers of micropattern units. The optimal condition for micropatterned coculture bioreactors is achieved by having the product of the length ratio and the reaction ratio equal to 1. This condition was used to optimize the mass transfer in the micropatterned system (Bhatia, 1999, “Effect of Cell-Cell Interactions in Preservation of Cellular henotype: Co-Cultivation of Hepatocytes and Nonparenchymal Cell  ,” FASEB J.13, pp. 1883–1900) based on bFGF.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Scheme of the rectangular microchannel bioreactor for micropatterned coculture (not to scale)

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Figure 2

Species concentration profiles in the 3D channel: Pe=10, Daa=0.5, αl=1, αDa=0.6, K¯ma=0.068, and α=0.4: (a) bottom plane (y=0), (b) center axial plane (z=0), (c) transverse release plane, and (d) transverse absorption plane.

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Figure 3

Effect of αl on species concentration distributions with different numbers of units at Pe=10, Daa=0.1 and 0.5, αDa=1.0, and K¯ma=0.068: (a) αl=2, (b) αl=1, and (c) αl=0.5

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Figure 4

Effect of αDa on species concentration distributions with different numbers of units at Pe=10, Daa=0.5, αl=1.0, and K¯ma=0.068: (a) αDa=1.5 and (b) αDa=0.5

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Figure 5

Collapse curves of species transport at base at each single unit with Daa=0.1, 0.5, αDa=0.5,1 with αl=1 and K¯ma=0.068

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Figure 6

Collapse curve for release parts with release concentration-reaction parameter as a function of release effective-distance at any αDa and Daa

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Figure 7

Collapse curves for absorption parts: (a) at different αDa, αl, and Daa but constant K¯ma=0.068 and (b) at different K¯ma, αl, and Daa but constant αDa=0.5

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Figure 8

Local effectiveness parameters for different numbers of units at Pe=10 and K¯ma=0.068: (a) αl=2, αDa=1.0, Daa=0.1, and 0.5 and (b) αDa=1.5, αl=1.0, and Daa=0.5

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Figure 9

Average effectiveness parameters as a function of numbers of units at Daa=0.1 and 0.5, Pe=10, and K¯ma=0.068: (a) αDa=1.0 with different αl and (b) αl=1.0 with different αDa.

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Figure 10

Average effectiveness parameters as a function of numbers of units at release and absorption parts with Daa=0.1 and 0.5, Pe=10, and K¯ma=0.068: (a) αlαDa=1.5 (b) αlαDa=1.0, and (c) αlαDa=0.5.

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