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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Bone/Orthopedic

Finite Element Modeling for Strain Rate Dependency of Fracture Resistance in Compact Bone

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Charoenphan, A. Polchai

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai, 50200 Thailand

J Biomech Eng 129(1), 20-25 (Aug 07, 2006) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2401179 History: Received July 15, 2005; Revised August 07, 2006

Crack growths in compact bones driven by various strain rate levels were studied using finite element modeling. The energy resistance curves in bovine femur cortical bones were characterized, whereas the orthotropic viscoelasticity in bone materials was accounted for to assess the effect of strain rate on the energy resistance curve. The models were also used to justify the anticipated plane strain response as a result of rather thick specimens used in experiments. Similarities were found between the experimental and model results when crack resistance ability exhibited in bones with slow loading rates, while unstable crack growth existed in bones with rapid loading rates. The critical energy release rates slightly decreased with the increase in strain rates. The hybrid experimental and computational method introduced in this study could be beneficial for application in fracture study in which standard experiments cannot be validly performed.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Bone axis orientation

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Figure 2

Compact tension specimen: (a) geometry, loading and boundary condition (all dimensions are in millimeter) and (b) finite element model with contour plots of stress in the y-direction showing stress concentration at the crack tip and the loading points

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Figure 3

Load-displacement curves; the dotted lines are the finite element model results and the solid lines are the experimental data; (a) plane stress and (b) plane strain

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Figure 4

Energy resistance curves; the dotted lines are the finite element model results and the solid lines are the experimental data; plus marks, hollow circles, and triangles represent results for loading rates of 6, 30, and 60mm∕min, respectively

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Figure 5

Crack velocities during the crack propagation; plus marks, hollow circles, and triangles represent results for loading rates of 6, 30, and 60mm∕min, respectively

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