0
DESIGN INNOVATION

Design of a Side-View Particle Imaging Velocimetry Flow System for Cell-Substrate Adhesion Studies

[+] Author and Article Information
Jordan Leyton-Mange, Sung Yang, Meghan H. Hoskins

Department of Bioengineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 205 Hallowell Building, University Park, PA 16802-6804

Robert F. Kunz

 Applied Research Laboratory, Computational Mechanics Division, P.O. Box 30, State College, PA 16804-0030

Jeffrey D. Zahn

Department of Bioengineering, The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, 205 Hallowell Building, University Park, PA 16802-6804

Cheng Dong1

Department of Bioengineering, The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, 205 Hallowell Building, University Park, PA 16802-6804cxd23@psu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 128(2), 271-278 (Oct 20, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2165689 History: Received July 08, 2005; Revised October 20, 2005

Experimental models that mimic the flow conditions in microcapillaries have suggested that the local shear stresses and shear rates can mediate tumor cell and leukocyte arrest on the endothelium and subsequent sustained adhesion. However, further investigation has been limited by the lack of experimental models that allow quantitative measurement of the hydrodynamic environment over adherent cells. The purpose of this study was to develop a system capable of acquiring quantitative flow profiles over adherent cells. By combining the techniques of side-view imaging and particle image velocimetry (PIV), an in vitro model was constructed that is capable of obtaining quantitative flow data over cells adhering to the endothelium. The velocity over an adherent leukocyte was measured and the shear rate was calculated under low and high upstream wall shear. The microcapillary channel was modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the calculated velocity profiles over cells under the low and high shear rates were compared to experimental results. The drag force applied to each cell by the fluid was then computed. This system provides a means for future study of the forces underlying adhesion by permitting characterization of the local hydrodynamic conditions over adherent cells.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Velocities over the top of the cell in the low shear case attained from (a) experimental PIV results, (b) CFD results, and (c) both PIV and CFD data plotted. Velocities in the high shear case attained from (d) experimental PIV results, (e) CFD results, and (f) both PIV and CFD data plotted. The computation model cells in (c) and (e) are shaded by the pressure distribution on the cell surface.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Velocity vector fields representing calculated velocity values associated with the images shown in Figs.  44

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

A large Jurkat cell of approximately 22μm in diameter was adhered under static conditions to an EI monolayer within the channel. Flow was applied in low and high shear cases to yield corresponding upstream wall shear rates of 51.0s−1 and 257.7s−1. Large deformation in the cell shape is apparent in both cases.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

(a) Front view of the channel grid used for the CFD simulations, (b) side view of the cell grid used to model the low shear case, and (c) high shear case, with dimensions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

(a) A top view experimental setup and a fluorescent image showing two 16μm diameter fluorescent beads, (b) a side view experimental setup when the focal plane is placed on the front bead (bead I), and its fluorescent image, and (c) when it is on the next bead (bead II) and its fluorescent image

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

(a) A schematic experimental setup for side view imaging and PIV data acquisition within a microchannel (700×550μm2). (b) A representative image frame with fluorescent tracer particles. The image is gridded into smaller interrogation windows to calculate local velocity vectors.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In