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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Fluids/Heat/Transport

Methodology for Predicting Oxygen Transport on an Intravenous Membrane Oxygenator Combining Computational and Analytical Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Amador M. Guzmán

Mechanical Engineering Department,  Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 10233, Santiago, Chile

Rodrigo A. Escobar

Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica y Metalúrgica,  Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago, Chile

Cristina H. Amon

Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Complex Engineered Systems,  Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890camon@cmu.edu

J Biomech Eng 127(7), 1127-1140 (Jul 12, 2005) (14 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2073669 History: Received March 15, 2005; Revised July 12, 2005

A computational methodology for accurately predicting flow and oxygen-transport characteristics and performance of an intravenous membrane oxygenator (IMO) device is developed, tested, and validated. This methodology uses extensive numerical simulations of three-dimensional computational models to determine flow-mixing characteristics and oxygen-transfer performance, and analytical models to indirectly validate numerical predictions with experimental data, using both blood and water as working fluids. Direct numerical simulations for IMO stationary and pulsating balloons predict flow field and oxygen transport performance in response to changes in the device length, number of fibers, and balloon pulsation frequency. Multifiber models are used to investigate interfiber interference and length effects for a stationary balloon whereas a single fiber model is used to analyze the effect of balloon pulsations on velocity and oxygen concentration fields and to evaluate oxygen transfer rates. An analytical lumped model is developed and validated by comparing its numerical predictions with experimental data. Numerical results demonstrate that oxygen transfer rates for a stationary balloon regime decrease with increasing number of fibers, independent of the fluid type. The oxygen transfer rate ratio obtained with blood and water is approximately two. Balloon pulsations show an effective and enhanced flow mixing, with time-dependent recirculating flows around the fibers regions which induce higher oxygen transfer rates. The mass transfer rates increase approximately 100% and 80%, with water and blood, respectively, compared with stationary balloon operation. Calculations with combinations of frequency, number of fibers, fiber length and diameter, and inlet volumetric flow rates, agree well with the reported experimental results, and provide a solid comparative base for analysis, predictions, and comparisons with numerical and experimental data.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Schematic representations of the multifiber models: (a) cross section with three, four and nine fibers; (b) isometric view with nine fibers. Dimensions: a=0.332cm; b=0.181cm; c=0.05cm; d=1.15cm; e=0.282cm; f=0.282cm; w=0.09, 0.17, and 0.27 cm; l=5.0 and 10.0 cm.

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Figure 3

Velocity fields in a center plane-cut view of the nine fiber model for 1, 2, and 3L∕min of inlet volumetric flow rate for stationary balloon simulations

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Figure 4

Oxygen concentration fields in a center plane-cut view of the nine fiber model for 1, 2, and 3L∕min of inlet volumetric flow rates for stationary balloon simulations

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Figure 5

Oxygen concentration field for 3L∕min of inlet volumetric flow rate in plane cuts perpendicular to the fibers length of the nine fiber model for stationary balloon simulations

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Figure 6

Oxygen flux as a function of inlet volumetric blood flow rate of the nine fiber model for a stationary balloon

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Figure 7

Velocity fields in center-plane cuts as a function of the inlet blood flow rate for the three fiber model

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Figure 8

Oxygen concentration fields in center-plane cuts as a function of the inlet blood flow rate for the three fiber model

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Figure 9

Oxygen flux versus inlet flow rate for the three and four fiber model, from 1 to 3L∕min, for water and blood

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Figure 10

Two instantaneous representations at times t=to+T∕4 and t=to+3T∕4, for one oscillation cycle T, in mid planes for inlet water flow rate of 2L∕min: (a) velocity; (b) oxygen concentration fields

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Figure 11

Temporal evolution of net oxygen flux from the fiber for inlet water flow rate of 2L∕min and frequency of 60 bpm

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Figure 12

Two instantaneous representations at times t=to+T∕4 and t=to+3T∕4, in mid planes for inlet blood flow rate of 2L∕min: (a) velocity; (b) oxygen concentration fields

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Figure 13

Lumped compartment analytical model: (a) schematic of main, intrafiber and balloon regions; (b) control volume interactions

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Figure 14

Oxygen flux versus balloon pulsation frequency for (a) analytical model and experimental data, L=25cm,f=60bpm,Qin=3L∕min, and 2300 fibers; (b) analytical model and numerical data, L=5cm,f=60bpm,Qin=2L∕min, and 133 fibers

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Figure 1

Schematic of the intravenous membrane oxygenator (IMO) device computational model and domain

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