0
TECHNICAL BRIEFS

A Motorized Microdrive for Recording of Neural Ensembles in Awake Behaving Rats

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Venkateswaran

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

Chris Boldt

Department of Neuroscience,  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

J. Parthasarathy

Department of Electrical Engineering,  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

B. Ziaie

Department of Electrical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Institute,  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

A. G. Erdman

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Institute,  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

A. D. Redish

Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering Institute,  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

J Biomech Eng 127(6), 1035-1040 (Jul 07, 2005) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2049332 History: Received April 06, 2005; Revised July 07, 2005

The recording of neural ensembles in awake, behaving rats has been an extremely successful experimental paradigm, providing demonstrable scientific advances. Dynamic control of the position of the implanted electrodes is of key importance as mobile electrodes provide a better signal-to-noise ratio and a better cell/electrode yield than nonmobile electrodes. Here we describe the use of low cost, soon to be commercially available dc motors to successfully control the depth of electrodes. The prototype designed is approximately 30mm in diameter and 50mm in length and weighed about 30gms. This paper presents the results of linear displacements of electrodes achievable with this motorized microdrive.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Kopf-2000 drive which facilitates the manual control of up to 14 tetrodes

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

(a) Seiko Epson dc motor. (b) Complete assembled microdrive. (c) Sectional view of the motor assembly with shuttles and lead screws.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Completely assembled microdrive implanted on a rat and connected to the neuralynx cheetah system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a) Comparison of manual and motorized turning for a 16th of a turn. (b) Comparison of manual and motorized turning for a 32nd of a turn.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

(a) Top: The above figure shows the average waveform of each of the four channels of one tetrode of the manual drive . The bars indicate the standard deviations. Bottom : The histogram depicts the number of spikes versus the interspike interval (ISI, time between spikes). (b) Top : The above figure shows the average waveform of each of the four channels of one tetrode of the motorized drive . The bars indicate the standard deviation. Bottom : The histogram depicts the number of spikes versus the interspike interval (ISI, time between spikes).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

(a) Place field responsiveness for pyramidal neurons using the manual drive . This is the ratio of the number of times a cell fires to the time spent by the animal in that section of the field. The scale refers to the firing rate in Hz. (b) Place field responsiveness for pyramidal neurons using the motorized drive . This is the ratio of the number of times a cell fires to the time spent by the animal in that section of the field. The scale refers to the firing rate in Hz.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In