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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Light Weight Compliant Hand Mechanism With High Degrees of Freedom

[+] Author and Article Information
Jason Potratz

Virtual Soldier Research (VSR) Program, Center for Computer-Aided Design, The University of Iowa, 111 Engineering Research Facility, Iowa City, IA 52242-1000

Jingzhou Yang1

Virtual Soldier Research (VSR) Program, Center for Computer-Aided Design, The University of Iowa, 111 Engineering Research Facility, Iowa City, IA 52242-1000jyang@engineering.uiowa.edu

Karim Abdel-Malek

Virtual Soldier Research (VSR) Program, Center for Computer-Aided Design, and Department of Biomedical Engineering The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1000

Esteban Peña Pitarch

Department Enginyeria Mecanica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Av. Bases de Manresa, 61-73, 08240 Manresa, Spain

Nicole Grosland

Virtual Soldier Research (VSR) Program, Center for Computer-Aided Design, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1000

1

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

J Biomech Eng 127(6), 934-945 (Aug 12, 2005) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2052805 History: Received March 31, 2005; Accepted August 12, 2005; Revised August 12, 2005

This paper presents the design and prototyping of an inherently compliant lightweight hand mechanism. The hand mechanism itself has 15 degrees of freedom and five fingers. Although the degrees of freedom in each finger are coupled, reducing the number of independent degrees of freedom to 5, the 15 degrees of freedom of the hand could potentially be individually actuated. Each joint consists of a novel flexing mechanism that is based on the loading of a compression spring in the axial and transverse direction via a cable and conduit system. Currently, a bench top version of the prototype is being developed; the three joints of each finger are coupled together to simplify the control system. The current control scheme under investigation simulates a control scheme where myoelectric signals in the wrist flexor and extensor muscles are converted in to x and y coordinates on a control scheme chart. Static load-deformation analysis of finger segments is studied based on a 3-dimensional model without taking the stiffener into account, and the experiment validates the simulation.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 3

Entire finger assembly

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Figure 4

Cable routing for two segments

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Figure 5

Entire hand assembly

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Figure 6

Fingertip trajectory, arrows specify fingertip orientation along the trajectory (in flexion/extension)

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Figure 7

Artificial and human hand (palm)

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Figure 1

Degrees of freedom of fingers (see Ref. 15)

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Figure 2

Finger segment with cable and conduit

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Figure 9

The spring element and the coordinate systems

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Figure 10

Coordinate systems (a). The relationship of three systems (b). xyz and x2y2z2

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Figure 11

Experiment setup for a finger of the hand mechanism

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Figure 12

Force transmission through cable 1

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Figure 13

State activation chart (see Ref. 17)

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Figure 14

(a) Grasping a ball, (b) grasping a key, (c) grasping a ball, (d) grasping a cylinder

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