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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Other

Design of a Sterile Organ Culture System for the Ex Vivo Study of Aortic Heart Valves

[+] Author and Article Information
James N. Warnock1

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA and  Georgia Tech∕Emory Center for the Engineering of Living Tissues, Atlanta, GAjwarnock@abe.msstate.edu

Suchitra Konduri

School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

Zhaoming He

Wallace H. Coulter School of Biomedical Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

Ajit P. Yoganathan

Wallace H. Coulter School of Biomedical Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA and  Georgia Tech∕Emory Center for the Engineering of Living Tissues, Atlanta, GA

1

Corresponding author. Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Mississippi State University, Box 9632, Mississippi State, MS 39762-9632. Telephone: (662) 325-8536; Fax: (662) 325-3853.

J Biomech Eng 127(5), 857-861 (Feb 28, 2005) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1992535 History: Received July 08, 2004; Revised February 28, 2005

The biological response of valves to mechanical forces is not well understood. The aim of this study was to design a pulsatile system to enable the ex vivo study of aortic valves when subjected to various hemodynamic conditions. A bioreactor was designed to subject porcine aortic valves to physiological and pathophysiological pressure and flow conditions, while maintaining viability and sterility. Pressure and flow rate could be independently controlled to produce clinically relevant mechanical conditions. The oxygen transfer rate was characterized and sterile operation was achieved over 96hours. The oxygenation capabilities ensure sufficient oxygen transport to valves, allowing operation for extended periods.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic diagram of the ex vivo organ culture system. A programmable piston pump (P) is used to drive water to and from the diaphragm chamber (DC), where a diaphragm separates sterile and nonsterile fluids. The downstream portion of this chamber mimics the left ventricle. Culture medium flows through the aortic valve (AV) and into a compliance tank (C) before returning to the diaphragm chamber via a mechanical mitral valve (MV). An ultrasonic flow probe and a pressure transducer are placed immediately downstream of the aortic valve.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Example pressure and flow curves demonstrating that the organ culture system can be operated under normal [(a) and (b)], hypertensive [(c) and (d)], severely hypertensive [(e) and (f)] and high flow rate and frequency [(g) and (h)] conditions. 500 data points were acquired per second using LABVIEW 5.1 (National Instruments, Austin, TX). The data represent mean values obtained from nine cycles.

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