0
Article

Computational Modeling of the Mechanical Behavior of the Cerebrospinal Fluid System

[+] Author and Article Information
Vartan Kurtcuoglu, Dimos Poulikakos

 Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies, Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zentrum, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland

Yiannis Ventikos1

 Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies, Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zentrum, CH-8092 Zurich, SwitzerlandYiannis.Ventikos@eng.ox.ac.uk

1

Corresponding author. Current address: Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ, UK

J Biomech Eng 127(2), 264-269 (Nov 06, 2004) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1865191 History: Received November 17, 2003; Revised November 06, 2004

A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the cerebrospinal fluid system was constructed based on a simplified geometry of the brain ventricles and their connecting pathways. The flow is driven by a prescribed sinusoidal motion of the third ventricle lateral walls, with all other boundaries being rigid. The pressure propagation between the third and lateral ventricles was examined and compared to data obtained from a similar geometry with a stenosed aqueduct. It could be shown that the pressure amplitude in the lateral ventricles increases in the presence of aqueduct stenosis. No difference in phase shift between the motion of the third ventricle walls and the pressure in the lateral ventricles because of the aqueduct stenosis could be observed. It is deduced that CFD can be used to analyze the pressure propagation and its phase shift relative to the ventricle wall motion. It is further deduced that only models that take into account the coupling between ventricles, which feature a representation of the original geometry that is as accurate as possible and which represent the ventricle boundary motion realistically, should be used to make quantitative statements on flow and pressure in the ventricular space.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Schematic of a general single compartment model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Ventricular geometry with finite-volume mesh in the absence of aqueduct stenosis. (a) Side view, (b) bottom view, and (c) perspective view. L: lateral ventricle, Mo: foramen of Monro, III: third ventricle, Aq: aqueduct of Sylvius, IV: fourth ventricle, Fo: representation of the foramina of Luschka and Magendie.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Rendering of a ventricular system segmented from in vivo MRI data. Data provided by Dr. P. Summers, Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Zurich.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Aqueduct of Sylvius, center section. Left: normal aqueduct. Right: stenosed aqueduct with a 25% smaller cross-sectional area half way between the third and fourth ventricle.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic median sagittal cut of the human brain displaying CSF circulation. Arrows indicate flow direction. L: lateral ventricles, Mo: foramen of Monro, III: third ventricle, Aq: aqueduct of Sylvius, IV: fourth ventricle, A: arachnoid villi, C: cerebellomedullary cistern, ChP: choroid plexus of lateral ventricles, S: superior sagittal sinus. (Based on: Putz/Pabst: Sobotta, Atlas der Anatomie des Menschen, 21th ed. 2000, © Elsevier, Urban & Fischer München. Used with permission).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Average pressure in the lateral ventricles over the course of one cycle, both in cases with and without aqueduct stenosis.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Maximum axial velocity in the aqueduct of Sylvius midway between the third and fourth ventricle. One cycle for both the stenosed and the regular system is depicted.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Pressure variation in the lateral ventricles in dependence of the third ventricle displacement and velocity. The graphs apply to both the ventricular system with and without aqueduct stenosis.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Streamlines and pressure distribution in median sagittal plane of third ventricle at times (a) t=0[s∕s], (b) t=0.25[s∕s], (c) t=0.5[s∕s], and (d) t=0.75[s∕s] in absence of aqueduct stenosis.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In