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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Cell

Comparison of the Effects of Cyclic Stretching and Compression on Endothelial Cell Morphological Responses

[+] Author and Article Information
Jeremiah J. Wille, Christina M. Ambrosi

Department of Biomedical Engineering, P.O. Box 1097, One Brookings Drive, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri USA

Frank C-P Yin

Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Department of Medicine, P.O. Box 1097, One Brookings Drive, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri USA

J Biomech Eng 126(5), 545-551 (Nov 23, 2004) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1798053 History: Received June 13, 2003; Revised February 20, 2004; Online November 23, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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Figures

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Low-magnification phase contrast photomicrographs of a group of unstretched cells (a), cells subjected to three hours of 10%, 10%/s cyclic stretching (b), three hours of 10%, 10%/s cyclic compression (c), and three hours of 10%, 10%/s cyclic stretching in the presence of gadolinium (d). The stretching was imposed in the horizontal direction.
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The effect of strain magnitude on orientation response of cells cyclically stretched for various durations at the same strain rate. Within each strain magnitude, the response at each time point is significantly different from control and from adjacent times. At each duration, every pairwise comparison for different magnitudes is significantly different except for the two circled pairs.
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The effect of strain rate on orientation response of cells cyclically stretched for various durations at two different strain magnitudes. At each duration, the pairwise differences were not significantly different except for those pairs connected by brackets. Note that the difference between 10%/s and 5%/s at 1 and 2 h are reversed–that is the angle for 5%/s is higher than 10%/s at 1 h but lower than 10%/s at 2 h. Taken together, the data suggest no statistically significant effect of strain rate on orientation response.
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The effect of strain magnitude on orientation response of cells cyclically compressed for various durations at the same strain rate using the same notation as in Fig. 2. Among all the pairwise comparisons, there are only four that are not significantly different. These results indicate that there is a statistically significant effect of compression magnitude on orientation response.
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The effect of strain rate on the orientation response of cells cyclically compressed for various durations at two different strain magnitudes with the same notation as in Fig. 3. Taken together, the data suggest that there is no statistically significant effect of compression rate on orientation response.
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Comparison of the temporal response to cyclic stretching S versus compression C at the same strain magnitude and strain rate. There is a statistically significant difference between stretching and compression on orientation response at each duration.
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Representative short and long-term responses of the actin stress fibers to10% magnitude, 10%/s rate cyclic stretching in untreated cells (left panels), and in those treated with GdCl3 (right panels). The stretching direction is horizontal.
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Comparison of the orientation responses to cyclic stretching of untreated and GdCl3 treated cells at the same strain magnitude and rate. Aside from the statistically significant but very small difference at three hours, overall there is no significant difference between treated and untreated cell responses.
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Representative actin stress fiber responses after various durations of 10%, 10%/s cyclic compression.

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