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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Fluids/Heat/Transport

Low Reynolds Number Viscous Flow in an Alveolated Duct

[+] Author and Article Information
Alexander Karl

Institut für Thermodynamik der Luft- und Raumfahrt, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 70550, Germany

Frank S. Henry

School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, London, U.K., EC1 V0HB

Akira Tsuda

Physiology Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115

J Biomech Eng 126(4), 420-429 (Sep 27, 2004) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1784476 History: Received May 24, 2003; Revised December 06, 2003; Online September 27, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Alveolated duct geometry. a) Typical section of duct. b) Detail of unit cell, where c=duct diameter, t=plate thickness, d=orifice diameter and w=distance between each pair of plates. c) Sample computational grid.
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Details of the experimental setup: schematic diagram of rig including fluid reservoir for steady state gravity column driven flow; photograph of the measuring section; and segments used to setup different geometries.
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Experimental results (raw image) for flow in the cavity within geometry Set 6 at a Reynolds number of Re=0.48. The flow direction is given by the arrow.
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Experimental flow details for geometry Set 1 at a Reynolds number of 0.648 evaluated with the PIV method. a) Three typical pathlines and b) Corresponding streamlines and velocity vectors (magnitude, cm/s; angle, degrees): P1 (3.95, 0.5), P2 (1.60,−15.0), P3 (1.65, 6.0), P4 (1.55, 12.0), P5 (0.75,−38.0), P6 (0.55,−23.0), P7 (0.50,−11.0), P8 (0.51,−4.0), P9 (0.58, 3.0), P10 (0.50, 9.0), P11 (0.50, 13.5), P12 (0.60, 31.0), P13 (0.80, 41.5).
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Experimental (a) and predicted (b) streamlines for Set 1 geometry (see Table 1) and Re=0.648.RA=0.17.
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Experimental (a) and predicted (b) streamlines for Set 2 geometry (see Table 1) and Re=0.648.RA=0.25.
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Experimental (a) and predicted (b) streamlines for Set 3 geometry (see Table 1) and Re=0.48.RA=0.50.
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Experimental (a) and predicted (b) streamlines for Set 4 geometry (see Table 1) and Re=0.648.RA=0.50.
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Experimental (a) and predicted (b) streamlines for Set 5 geometry (see Table 1) and Re=0.96.RA=0.67.
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Experimental (a) and predicted (b) streamlines for Set 6 geometry (see Table 1) and Re=0.48.RA=1.00.
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Particle positions at various times. Set 5 geometry (see Table 1) and Re=0.96. (a) Experimental data at time intervals, Δt, of 0.08s for the top line, 0.2s for the next lower line, 1.0s for the line just above the cavity opening and 1.0s for the closed line within the cavity. (b) Predicted data at time intervals, Δt, of 0.03s for the top line, 0.15s for the next lower line, 0.3s for the line just above the cavity opening and 3.0s for the closed line within the cavity. Note that the difference in time intervals for the experiments and the predictions, reported above, is simply a consequence of the time increments permitted by the experimental recording equipment and the time step necessary for accurate predictions of the particle tracks.
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Change of the ratio of cavity flow rate, QC, to central duct flow, QD, with Reynolds number, Re, for Set 5 geometry.
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Change of the ratio of cavity flow rate, QC, to central duct flow, QD, with cavity aspect ratio, RA.
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Change of volume flow rate ratio, QC/QD and the square of the diameter ratio d/c with cavity aspect ratio, RA.
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Variation of time taken for a particle to traverse one closed pathway in the cavity with radial distance for Set 5 geometry and Re=0.048.
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Predicted radial and axial velocity profiles (both at same scale) in the cavity for Set 5 geometry and Re=0.048. The axial profile is positioned at the center of the lower wall of the cavity and the radial profile is positioned at the mid-height point of the vertical cavity wall.

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