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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Joint/Whole Body

Simultaneous In Vitro Measurement of Patellofemoral Kinematics and Forces

[+] Author and Article Information
Amy B. Zavatsky, Paul T. Oppold

Dept. of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PJ, U.K.

Andrew J. Price

Nuffield Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Oxford, Nuffield Orthopaedic Center NHS Trust, Oxford, OX3 7LD, U.K.e-mail: andrew.price@ndos.ox.ac.uk

J Biomech Eng 126(3), 351-356 (Jun 24, 2004) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1762896 History: Received April 24, 2003; Revised July 11, 2003; Online June 24, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Sagittal view of the experimental test setup, showing the knee specimen with the patellar transducer implanted. Marker arrays are attached to the tibia (left), patellar transducer (center), and femur (right), with two single markers on the patellar tendon. The cable used to simulate quadriceps force is visible on the right. The load causing the knee to flex is shown at the bottom right. A Vicon 370 camera can be seen in the background.
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Sagittal view of the knee showing patellar force transducer axes (x-axis positive medially in a right knee) and sign convention for patellar tendon angle. (b) Joint coordinate system (JCS) axes and rotations for the patellofemoral joint.
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(a) Ab/adduction and (b) tibiofemoral long-axis rotation plotted against tibiofemoral flexion angle. Average (solid line) ± one standard deviation (dashed lines).
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(a) Patellar flexion, (b) rotation [internal (+), external (−)], and (c) tilt [medial (+), lateral (−)] plotted against tibiofemoral flexion angle. Average (solid line) ± one standard deviation (dashed lines).
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Patellar tendon angle plotted against tibiofemoral flexion angle. Average (solid line) ± one standard deviation (dashed lines).
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Quadriceps force (N) plotted against tibiofemoral flexion angle (degs). Average (solid line) ± one standard deviation (dashed lines).
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Mediolateral, (b) proximodistal, and (c) anteroposterior components of patellofemoral force (N) plotted against tibiofemoral flexion angle (degrees). Average (solid line) ± one standard deviation (dashed lines). PFF=patellofemoral force.
Grahic Jump Location
Average point of application of patellofemoral force on the plane of patella resection. Error bars show ± one standard deviation from the mean for 5, 30, 60, 90, and 115 deg tibiofemoral flexion.

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