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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Soft Tissues

Numerical Simulation of Flow in Mechanical Heart Valves: Grid Resolution and the Assumption of Flow Symmetry

[+] Author and Article Information
Liang Ge, S. Casey Jones, Fotis Sotiropoulos

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0335

Timothy M. Healy

Exxon Mobil Research and Engineering, 3225 Gallows Road, Fairfax, VA 22037

Ajit P. Yoganathan

Walter H. Coulter School of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0535

J Biomech Eng 125(5), 709-718 (Oct 09, 2003) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1614817 History: Received March 27, 2002; Revised April 28, 2003; Online October 09, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Geometry and coordinate definitions of the modeled bileaflet mechanical heart valve: (a) the symmetric aorta with the inset showing the two leaflets; (b) cross section of the y-z plane showing the details of a typical overset grid arrangement for the aorta and the H-H grids for the leaflets.
Grahic Jump Location
Time history of axial (dashed line) and vertical (solid line) velocity components at a point downstream of the leaflets on the horizontal plane of symmetry (Re=750, Grid A). Time is measured from the start of the impulsive acceleration from Re=500 to Re=750. For clarity, the initial transients (t<20) are omitted.
Grahic Jump Location
Snapshots of transverse-velocity vectors (left column) and axial-velocity contours (right column) at a section downstream of the leaflets showing the symmetry breaking of the flow with respect to the horizontal plane of symmetry (Re=750, Grid A). Time is measured from the start of the impulsive acceleration from Re=500 to Re=750: (a)t=1,(b)t=22,(c)t=26,(d)t=29.
Grahic Jump Location
Time history of axial (dashed line) and vertical (solid line) velocity components at a point downstream of the leaflets on the horizontal plane of symmetry (Re=750, Grid B). Time is measured from the start of the calculation on the Grid B.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of streamwise (axial) vorticity (left) and velocity (right) contours calculated on the Grids B-D at Re=750. The cross section shown is the same one shown in Fig. 3 (Vorticity contour levels: −3 to 3 by 1; velocity contour levels: −0.2 to 2.0 by 0.2).
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of calculated velocity profiles at Re=750 on all four grids along the x and y axes at the same cross section as shown in Figs. 3 and 5. The medium- (Grid B) and fine-grid (Grids C and D) profiles are steady-state results, while the coarse-grid (Grid A) profiles correspond to one instant in time.
Grahic Jump Location
Time history of axial (dashed line) and vertical (solid line) velocity components at a point down-stream of the leaflets on the horizontal plane of symmetry (Re=1200, Grid B). Time is measured from the start of the impulsive acceleration from Re=1000 to Re=1200.
Grahic Jump Location
Snapshots of transverse-velocity vectors at a section downstream of the leaflets showing the symmetry breaking of the flow with respect to the vertical and horizontal planes of symmetry (Re=1200, Grid B). Time is measured from the start of the impulsive acceleration from Re=1000 to Re=1200: (a)t=0.5,(b)t=8.4,(c)t=8.8,(d)t=9.2,(e)t=9.6(f)t=29.
Grahic Jump Location
Instantaneous contours of the vorticity component normal to each symmetry plane for Re=1200 (Grid B)
Grahic Jump Location
Iso-surfaces of streamwise (axial) vorticity for Re=500, Re=750 (steady solution), and Re=1200 (instantaneous image) showing the increasing complexity of the coherent vortices in the flow with Re.

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