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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Joint/Whole Body

The Use of Sequential MR Image Sets for Determining Tibiofemoral Motion: Reliability of Coordinate Systems and Accuracy of Motion Tracking Algorithm

[+] Author and Article Information
Amy L. Lerner, Arthur D. Salo

Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627

Jose G. Tamez-Pena

Dept. of Electrical and Computer Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627

Jeff R. Houck

Ithaca College Physical Therapy Program, Rochester Campus, Rochester, NY 14623

Jiang Yao

Dept of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14623

Heather L. Harmon

Ithaca College Physical Therapy Program, Rochester Campus, Rochester, NY 14627

Saara M. S. Totterman

Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627

J Biomech Eng 125(2), 246-253 (Apr 09, 2003) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1557615 History: Received October 01, 2001; Revised November 01, 2002; Online April 09, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
MR-compatible apparatus designed for validation of tibia motion in knee joint. Bones were cut at mid-shaft and potted in PVC pipe for mounting in the frame. Translations in the medial/lateral, anterior/posterior and inferior/superior directions were simulated by shifting the field of view in sequential scans. For internal/external rotation, the tibia pot was rotated in the clockwise or counterclockwise directions. Flexion and extension were simulated by pivoting around each end of the frame. Imposed or simulated motions were then compared to those derived from automatic segmentation and motion tracking algorithms. The frame was placed in a biosafe chamber within the MR scanner with two custom-designed dual-phased array coil positioned above and below the knee joint (not shown).
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of simulated and imposed tibia centroid translations to those predicted by the motion tracking algorithm. In simulated translations (open diamonds) the image field of view was shifted in the medial/lateral, anterior/posterior and inferior/superior directions without actual motion of the specimen. In seven trials, the tibia was internally or externally rotated in combination with shifts of the field of view and the imposed translation of the centroid was compared to the predictions (closed squares). Overall, the regression slope was not significantly different from 1.0 and the RMS error was 0.39 mm. Slightly higher RMS error for the translations due to rotations (0.59 mm) than the simulated motions (0.38 mm) may reflect imprecision in positioning of the knee.
Grahic Jump Location
Rotations and translations of the knee joint during passive knee flexion as predicted by the motion tracking algorithm and by manually digitized points.
Grahic Jump Location
Selection of points for establishment of femur anatomic reference systems. (a) Medial and lateral femoral points (b) Distal femoral point was the origin of femur axes and located at intercondylar notch. (c) Proximal femoral point was located at the centroid of bone cross-section. The lines in (b) indicate the positions of the corresponding axial slices on the sagittal view.
Grahic Jump Location
Selection of points for establishment of tibial anatomic reference systems. (a) Medial and lateral tibial points were defined from an axial slice at the tip of the fibular head. (b) Distal tibial point was located at the centroid of bone cross-section. (c) Tibial origin was placed at medial intercondylar eminence (MIE). (d) Proximal tibial point was located in the medial/lateral direction at the midpoint between the medial and lateral intercondylar eminence. (e) The anterior/posterior location of proximal tibial point was at the centroid of the tibia cross-section located at the base of the tibia/fibula interface. The lines in (c) indicate the positions of the corresponding axial slices on the sagittal view.

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