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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Fluids/Heat/Transport

The Effect of Asymmetry in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Under Physiologically Realistic Pulsatile Flow Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
E. A. Finol

Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Faculty, Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213

K. Keyhani

Research and Development, Asyst Technologies, Fremont, CA 94538

C. H. Amon

Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213

J Biomech Eng 125(2), 207-217 (Apr 09, 2003) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1543991 History: Received February 01, 2002; Revised November 01, 2002; Online April 09, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Wall shear stress surface distributions for Rem=300 at t=0.20 s in (a) model #1-β=1.0, (b) model #3-β=0.6 and (c) model #5-β=0.3
Grahic Jump Location
Wall shear stress surface distributions for Rem=300 at t=0.30 s in (a) model #1-β=1.0, (b) model #3-β=0.6 and (c) model #5-β=0.3
Grahic Jump Location
Dependence of maximum wall shear stress on (a) time-average Reynolds number and (b) asymmetry parameter, at peak flow
Grahic Jump Location
Finite element discretization of three-dimensional AAA models, for which d=1.6 cm, D=3d, L=6d, and LT=9.4d. A varying degree of asymmetry is considered for model #1-β=1.0 (axisymmetric), model #2-β=0.8,[[ellipsis]], model #5-β=0.3.
Grahic Jump Location
Pulsatile volumetric flow rate (Q) and instantaneous Reynolds number (Re) for Rem=300. Peak systolic flow occurs at t=0.31 s and diastolic phase begins at t=0.52 s. Flow phases (1) to (4) are described in the Flow Dynamics section.
Grahic Jump Location
Schematic of the transverse (x-z) and medial (y-z) planes used to evaluate the velocity field
Grahic Jump Location
Velocity vectors for Rem=300 in model #1 (β=1.0) at different stages of the cardiac cycle (t=0.20, 0.30, 0.42, 0.52 and 1.00 s) for the (a) x-z plane and (b) y-z plane
Grahic Jump Location
Velocity vectors for Rem=300 in model #5 (β=0.3) at different stages of the cardiac cycle (t=0.20, 0.30, 0.42, 0.52 and 1.00 s) for the (a) x-z plane and (b) y-z plane
Grahic Jump Location
Cross-streamwise velocity vectors for Rem=300 at the proximal end, midsection and distal end of model #5 (β=0.3); (a) location of selected cross-sections, (b) vectors for t=0.20 s and (c) vectors for t=1.00 s
Grahic Jump Location
Wall pressure surface distributions for Rem=300 at t=0.29 s in (a) model #1-β=1.0, (b) model #3-β=0.6 and (c) model #5-β=0.3.

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