0
TECHNICAL BRIEF

On the Sensitivity of Wall Stresses in Diseased Arteries to Variable Material Properties

[+] Author and Article Information
S. D. Williamson, Y. Lam, H. F. Younis, H. Huang, S. Patel, M. R. Kaazempur-Mofrad, R. D. Kamm

Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Biological Engineering Division, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139

J Biomech Eng 125(1), 147-155 (Feb 14, 2003) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1537736 History: Received June 01, 2000; Revised July 01, 2002; Online February 14, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Cheng,  G. C., Loree,  H. M., Kamm,  R. D., Fishbein,  M. C., and Lee,  R. T., 1993, “Distribution of Circumferential Stress in Ruptured and Stable Atherosclerotic Lesions,” Circulation, 1179–1187.
Richardson,  P. D., Davies,  M. J., and Born,  G. V. R., 1989, “Influence of Plaque Configuration and Stress Distribution on Fissuring of Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaques,” Lancet, pp. 941–944
Humphrey,  J. D., 1995, “Mechanics of the Arterial Wall: Review and Directions,” Crit. Rev. Biomed. Eng., 23, pp. 82–90.
Loree,  H. M., Grodzinsky,  A. J., Park,  S. Y., Gibson,  L. J., and Lee,  R. T., 1994, “Static Circumferential Tangential Modulus of Human Atherosclerotic Tissue,” J. Biomech., 27, pp. 195–204.
Patel,  D. J., Janicki,  J. S., and Carew,  T. E., 1969, “Static Anisotropic Elastic Properties of the Aorta in Living Dogs,” Circ. Res., 25, pp. 765–779.
Jones, R. M., 1975, “Macromechanical Behavior of a Lamina,” in Mechanics of Composite Materials, New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., pp. 31–47.
Loree,  H. M., Kamm,  R. D., Stringfellow,  R. G., and Lee,  R. T., 1992, “Effects of Fibrous Cap Thickness on Peak Circumferential Stress in Model Atherosclerotic Vessels,” Circ. Res., 71, pp. 850–858.
Loree,  H. M., Tobias,  B. J., Gibson,  L. J., Kamm,  R. D., Small,  D. M., and Lee,  R. T., 1994, “Mechanical Properties of Model Atherosclerotic Lesion Lipid Pools,” Arterioscler. Thromb., 14, pp. 230–234.
Bathe, K. J.: Finite Element Procedures. Saddle River, New Jersey, Prentice Hall, Inc, 1996, p 290.
Delfino,  A., Stergiopulos,  N., Moore,  J. E. and Meister,  J. J., 1997, “Residual Strain Effects on the Stress Field in a Thick Wall Finite Element Model of the Human Carotid Bifurcation,” J. Biomech., 30, pp. 777–86.
Holzapfel,  G. A., Gasser,  T. C., and Ogden,  R. W., 2000, “A New Constitutive Framework for Arterial Wall Mechanics and a Comparative Study of Material Models.” J. Elast., 61, pp. 1–48.
ADINA: Automatic Dynamic Incremental Nonlinear Analysis, Watertown, MA.
Dobrin,  P. B., 1986, “Biaxial Anisotropy of Dog Carotid Artery: Estimation of Circumferential Elastic Modulus,” J. Biomech., 19, pp. 351–358.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Histology of the post mortem specimen obtained from the coronary artery. Segmentation provided by Dr. Renu Virmani.
Grahic Jump Location
Computational mesh with the model test points labeled. Red indicates normal arterial wall (media and adventitia combined), blue, fibrous plaque, purple, calcified plaque, and green, lipid pools.
Grahic Jump Location
Diagram of residual stress calculation and application.
Grahic Jump Location
Maximum principal stress band plot (in Pa) for isotropic trials using average parameters. The triangle indicates the location of maximum stress while the star indicates the location of minimum stress. Nonlinear isotropic (a) and nonlinear isotropic with residual stresses (b). In the nonlinear isotropic run, the location of maximum stress is also the rupture site.
Grahic Jump Location
Maximum principal stress band plot (Pa) for a transversely isotropic trial of average parameters. The triangle indicates the point of maximum stress while the star indicates the point of minimum stress. In the transversely isotropic and nonlinear isotropic with residual strain runs, the point of maximum stress is in an area of artificial stress concentration.
Grahic Jump Location
Graphical representation of maximum principal stress (panel a) and strain (panel b) vs. location in specimen for anisotropic and isotropic nonlinear (with and without residual strains). The specific locations in the specimen were: RUP, the rupture site, TP1, test point one, and TP2, test point two (see Fig. 2). The region (artery, fibrous, etc.) identifies in which portion of the model the parameters were changed in a given test (color coded in Fig. 2). Legend in (a) is applicable to both panels.
Grahic Jump Location
Sensitivity of maximum principal stress (in % change from nominal values) for the isotropic nonlinear without residual strains model, vs. % change in a (left panel) and b (right panel) coefficients of the corresponding material as indicated in legend of (a). Legend in (a) is applicable to all plots.
Grahic Jump Location
Sensitivity of maximum principal strain (in % change from nominal values) for the isotropic nonlinear model without residual strains, vs. % change in a (left panel) and b (right panel) coefficients of the corresponding material as indicated in legend of (a). Legend in (a) is applicable to all plots.
Grahic Jump Location
Sensitivity of maximum principal stress and strain for the isotropic model with nonlinear residual strains, due to a −50% change in a (left panel) and b (right panel) of the corresponding material as indicated in each panel.
Grahic Jump Location
Sensitivity of maximum principal stress and strain for the anisotropic model, due to −10% change in νθz of the corresponding material as indicated in each panel.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In