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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Manipulation of Remodeling Pathways to Enhance the Mechanical Properties of a Tissue Engineered Blood Vessel

[+] Author and Article Information
Brenda M. Ogle, Daniel L. Mooradian

The Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455The Department of Surgery/ Transplantation Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905

J Biomech Eng 124(6), 724-733 (Dec 27, 2002) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1519278 History: Received December 01, 2001; Revised July 01, 2002; Online December 27, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Representative stress/strain plots for TEBVs treated with RA (0.1 mM), AA (0.3 mM), RA (0.1 mM)/AA (0.3 mM) and untreated TEBVs following 30 days of treatment (n=9 for each treatment). Curves were generated using least squares regression of stress/strain data (R2≥0.97). Native vessel stress/strain profile is added for comparison.
Grahic Jump Location
TEBV UTS as a function of time for both RA (0.1 mM)/AA (0.3 mM) treated TEBVs and untreated TEBVs. Mean values are plotted with standard deviations indicated. The number of TEBVs tested was six or greater for all points plotted. Statistically significant differences between treated and untreated groups at individual time points: * p<0.05.
Grahic Jump Location
TEBV Rate of Relaxation as a function of time for both RA (0.1 mM)/AA (0.3 mM) treated TEBVs and untreated TEBVs. Mean values are plotted with standard deviations indicated. The number of TEBVs tested was six or greater for all points plotted. Statistically significant differences between treated and untreated groups at individual time points: * p<0.05.
Grahic Jump Location
TEBV Elastic Efficiency as a function of time for both RA (0.1 mM)/AA (0.3 mM) treated TEBVs and untreated TEBVs. Mean values are plotted with standard deviations indicated. The number of TEBVs tested was six or greater for all points plotted. Statistically significant differences between treated and untreated groups at individual time points: * p<0.05.
Grahic Jump Location
Collagen synthesis: comparison of RA/AA treated TEBV expression to untreated TEBV expression. Treated and untreated TEBVs were enzymatically digested and collagenous proteins were isolated. Data is expressed as the ratio of RA/AA treated TEBV collagen expression (relative to total protein) to untreated TEBV collagen expression (relative to total protein). Statistically significant differences between RA/AA treated and untreated TEBV collagen synthesis at individual time points: * p<0.05.
Grahic Jump Location
Elastin synthesis: comparison of RA/AA treated TEBV expression to untreated TEBV expression. Treated and untreated TEBVs were digested with cyanogen bromide isolating elastin protein. Statistically significant differences between RA/AA treated and untreated TEBV elastin synthesis at individual time points: * p<0.05.
Grahic Jump Location
Correlation of TEBV elastin synthesis with TEBV elasticity (RR/EE). Individual points are average values measured from individual TEBVs with at least six samples tested for each treatment group. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that 96% of the variation in EE could be explained by variation in elastin synthesis and 86% of the variation in RR could be explained by variation in elastin synthesis.
Grahic Jump Location
Collagen mRNA expression: comparison of RA/AA treated TEBV expression to untreated TEBV expression. Total RNA was extracted from treated and untreated TEBVs. RT-PCR was performed on the isolated RNA probing for proαl(I) collagen and the internal standard G3PDH. Data is reported as a percentage of G3PDH. Statistically significant differences between RA/AA treated and untreated TEBV collagen mRNA expression at individual time points: * p<0.05.
Grahic Jump Location
Elastin mRNA expression: comparison of RA/AA treated TEBV expression to untreated TEBV expression. Total RNA was extracted from treated and untreated TEBVs. RT-PCR was performed on the isolated RNA probing for elastin and the internal standard G3PDH. Data is reported as a percentage of G3PDH. Statistically significant differences between RA/AA treated and untreated TEBV elastin mRNA expression at individual time points: * p<0.05.
Grahic Jump Location
Histology of TEBV at 15, and 45 days in culture. Movat’s pentachrome stain processed as described in the Materials and Methods section; dark red=muscle,yellow=collagen,black=elastin. A: 15 day untreated TEBV cross-section (200x), B: 15 day RA/AA treated TEBV cross-section (200x), C: 45 day untreated TEBV cross-section (400X), D: 45 day RA/AA treated TEBV cross-section (400X).

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