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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Accuracy of Elastic Property Measurement in Mandibular Cortical Bone is Improved by Using Cylindrical Specimens

[+] Author and Article Information
C. L. Schwartz-Dabney, P. C. Dechow

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Baylor College of Dentistry, A Member of The Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, Dallas, TX 75246

J Biomech Eng 124(6), 714-723 (Dec 27, 2002) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1517567 History: Received October 01, 2001; Revised July 01, 2002; Online December 27, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Coordinate axes of the three different shapes of specimens: brick, trimmed brick and cylindrical. Direction 1 is the specimen thickness. Direction 2 is the assumed axis of minimum velocity (or stiffness) within the plane of the cortical plate and direction 3 is the assumed axis of maximum velocity (or stiffness) within the plane of the cortical plate. The brick specimen (left) was used for aluminum specimens, which are homogeneous and do not have differences in elastic properties by direction. In the trimmed brick mandibular specimens (center), material axes were based on anatomical coordinates. In the cylindrical mandibular specimens, directions 2 and 3 represent material axes based on anatomical coordinates while directions 2 and 3 were determined ultrasonically.
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Anterior mandibular sites for comparison of trimmed brick and cylindrical cortical specimens. These sites were chosen because of similarities between them in elastic properties and density. The data from the four sites were combined for this study.
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Longitudinal and transverse wave propagation times versus distances for aluminum (A&B), femoral bone (C&D), and human mandibular bone (E&F). R values and coefficients of variation (CV) are presented on the graph. Mean wavelength is indicated by a dashed vertical line.
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Longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic velocities through varying specimen thicknesses for aluminum (A&B), femoral bone (C&D), and human mandibular bone (E&F). Samples correspond to those illustrated in Fig. 3. Mean wavelength is indicated by a dashed vertical line. Mean velocity is indicated by the solid horizontal line.
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Longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic velocities perpendicular to the direction of varying specimen thicknesses for aluminum (A&B), femoral bone (C&D), and human mandibular bone (E&F). Samples correspond to those illustrated in Figures 3&4 but velocities are measured along different axes. Mean wavelength is indicated by a dashed vertical line. Mean velocity is indicated by the solid horizontal line.
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Longitudinal and transverse propagation times versus distance (upper figures) and corresponding ultrasonic velocities (lower figures) through brick, trimmed brick and cylindrical aluminum specimens of varying widths (propagation distances). Symbols represent brick ( ), trimmed brick (▵) and cylindrical (□) specimens, although the data points overlap to such a degree that it is difficult to discriminate individual shapes. Changing the shape of the specimen did not affect either the longitudinal or transverse velocities, although velocities were reduced in the smallest specimens.

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