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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Experimental Measurements of the Temperature Variation Along Artery-Vein Pairs from 200 to 1000 μm Diameter in Rat Hind Limb

[+] Author and Article Information
Qinghong He, Liang Zhu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250

Daniel E. Lemons

Department of Biology, City College of City University of New York, New York, NY 10031

Sheldon Weinbaum

Department of Mechanical Engineering, City College of City University of New York, New York, NY 10031

J Biomech Eng 124(6), 656-661 (Dec 27, 2002) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1517061 History: Received January 01, 2001; Revised July 01, 2002; Online December 27, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Schematic diagram of the vasculature in rat hind leg and the locations of temperature sensors.
Grahic Jump Location
Blood perfusion rates measured under different physiological conditions. Vertical bars denote mean±SD.n is the number of rats used. ⋆: blood perfusion rate that is significantly different (p<0.05) from that under normal conditions.
Grahic Jump Location
Experimentally measured rectal temperature, skin temperature, and temperatures along the artery under different physiological conditions. A1,A2, and A3 represent different thermocouple locations along the arteries. n is the number of the measurements at each temperature sensor location. Vertical bars denote mean±SD. ⋆: temperature that is significantly different (p<0.05) from that under normal conditions at each measurement location.
Grahic Jump Location
Temperature variations along the femoral vein and its saphenous branches under different physiological conditions. V1,V2, and V3 represent different thermocouple locations along the veins. n is the number of measurements at each temperature sensor location. Vertical bars denote mean±SD. ⋆: temperature that is significantly different (p<0.05) from that under normal conditions at each measurement location.
Grahic Jump Location
Temperature differences between the countercurrent artery and vein along its axial direction under different physiological conditions.
Grahic Jump Location
Dimensionless temperatures along blood vessel surfaces in the rat hind limb under both normal and hyperemic conditions. Symbols represent experimentally measured dimensionless blood vessel surface temperature at different thermocouple locations. Lines denote the theoretically predicted blood vessel wall temperature in the axial direction.

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