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Research Papers

FSI Analysis of a Human Trachea Before and After Prosthesis Implantation

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Malvè, A. Pérez del Palomar, S. Chandra, J. L. López-Villalobos, E. A. Finol, A. Ginel, M. Doblaré

Group of Structural Mechanics and Materials Modeling  Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A) Universidad de Zaragoza C/María de Luna s/n, E-50018 Zaragoza, Spain Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), C/Poeta Mariano Esquillor s/n, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain e-mail: mmalve@unizar.esM2BE—Multiscale in Mechanical and Biological Engineering,  Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), Universidad de Zaragoza, C/María de Luna s/n, E-50018 Zaragoza, Spain Institute for Complex Engineered Systems (ICES), Carnegie Mellon University, 1205 Hamburg Hall, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Avenida de Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Seville, Spain Institute for Complex Engineered Systems (ICES), Carnegie Mellon University, 1205 Hamburg Hall, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Avenida de Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Seville, SpainGroup of Structural Mechanics and Materials Modeling  Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A) Universidad de Zaragoza C/María de Luna s/n, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), C/Poeta Mariano Esquillor s/n, E-50018 Zaragoza, Spain

J Biomech Eng 133(7), 071003 (Jul 13, 2011) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004315 History: Received December 13, 2010; Revised May 10, 2011; Posted May 30, 2011; Published July 13, 2011; Online July 13, 2011

In this work we analyzed the response of a stenotic trachea after a stent implantation. An endotracheal stent is the common treatment for tracheal diseases such as stenosis, chronic cough, or dispnoea episodes. Medical treatment and surgical techniques are still challenging due to the difficulties in overcoming potential complications after prosthesis implantation. A finite element model of a diseased and stented trachea was developed starting from a patient specific computerized tomography (CT) scan. The tracheal wall was modeled as a fiber reinforced hyperelastic material in which we modeled the anisotropy due to the orientation of the collagen fibers. Deformations of the tracheal cartilage rings and of the muscular membrane, as well as the maximum principal stresses, are analyzed using a fluid solid interaction (FSI) approach. For this reason, as boundary conditions, impedance-based pressure waveforms were computed modeling the nonreconstructed vessels as a binary fractal network. The results showed that the presence of the stent prevents tracheal muscle deflections and indicated a local recirculatory flow on the stent top surface which may play a role in the process of mucous accumulation. The present work gives new insight into clinical procedures, predicting their mechanical consequences. This tool could be used in the future as preoperative planning software to help the thoracic surgeons in deciding the optimal prosthesis type as well as its size and positioning.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

CT-reconstructed (a) diseased and (b) stented trachea with their respective computational grids

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Figure 2

Fractal network (left) and impedance-based outflow conditions (right) for (a) stenotic and (b) stented trachea. The red curve represents the flow measured through the patient specific spirometry, green and blue curves represent the computed impedance-based pressure waveforms for left and right bronchus, respectively.

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Figure 3

Velocity field (in m/s) at peak during inspiration (top panel) and expiration (bottom panel) for the diseased and the stented trachea

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Figure 4

Pressure distribution (in Pa) for the diseased and the stented trachea at peak flow during [(a) and (b)] inspiration and [(c) and (d)] expiration, respectively

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Figure 5

Vorticity magnitude (in s-1) at peak flow during (a) inspiration and (b) expiration for the trachea after prosthesis implantation

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Figure 6

Comparison of the muscular membrane deflection (in m) at selected time points during inspiration (top left and right) and expiration (bottom left and right)

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Figure 7

Comparison of the maximum principal stress (in Pa) of the stenotic cap and the stent at peak flow inspiration (top left and right) and expiration (bottom left and right) (A = cartilage side, P = muscular side)

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Figure 8

Comparison of the maximum principal stress (in Pa) of the cartilage rings for the diseased and the trachea after prosthesis implantation at peak flow during [(a) and (b)] inspiration and [(c) and (d)] expiration

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