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TECHNICAL PAPERS

An Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Diarthrodial Joint Contact Using Penetration Data and the Finite Element Method

[+] Author and Article Information
W. L. Dunbar

Johnson & Johnson Professional, Inc. Raynham, MA 02767-0350

K. Ün, P. S. Donzelli, R. L. Spilker

Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Scientific Computation Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180-3590

J Biomech Eng 123(4), 333-340 (Mar 26, 2001) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1384876 History: Received February 24, 2000; Revised March 26, 2001
Copyright © 2001 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Definition of penetration quantities for the analysis of tissue A. The total penetration measured along the surface normal of tissue A is denoted as gTot. To analyze A, the thicknesses of both tissues, denoted as hA and hB, are also measured along this surface normal.
Grahic Jump Location
Problem definition and geometry for the two-dimensional biphasic contact and three-dimensional penetration-based analyses. Cartilage layers (dark gray) are attached to rigid bone (light gray). A force is applied along the axis of symmetry. The centerline thickness of layers A and B, and radii of curvature are defined. The geometry shown is for case VT. The corresponding geometric parameters for cases CT and VT are given in millimeters in the table.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of normal elastic traction and pressure on layers A and B obtained from penetration and contact analysis for both case CT and VT plotted as a function of the distance (radius) from the axis at t=0.1 s. Contacting pairs have the same Young’s moduli (a) or layer B has half the Young’s modulus of layer A (b).
Grahic Jump Location
Normal elastic traction on layer A of case CT obtained from penetration and contact analysis plotted as a function of the distance (radius) from the axis at t=0.1 s
Grahic Jump Location
Total normal traction on layer A of case VT obtained from penetration and contact analysis plotted as a function of the distance (radius) from the axis at t=0.1 s
Grahic Jump Location
Axial displacement on layers A and B of case CT obtained from penetration and contact analysis plotted as a function of the distance (radius) from the axis at t=0.1 s
Grahic Jump Location
The penetration distribution assigned to a curved surface, where g denotes the varying penetration field and R is the radius of curvature. Line segment of length d takes the length d′ after penetration is applied.

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