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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Kinematic Accuracy of Three Surface Registration Methods in a Three-Dimensional Wrist Bone Study

[+] Author and Article Information
C. P. Neu

Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912

R. D. McGovern

Department of Orthopædics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912

J. J. Crisco

Department of Orthopædics, Division of Engineering, Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, Orthopædic Research SWP-3, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903

J Biomech Eng 122(5), 528-533 (Apr 02, 2000) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1289992 History: Received July 14, 1999; Revised April 02, 2000
Copyright © 2000 by ASME
Topics: Rotation , Bone , Errors , Motion
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References

Figures

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Cadaveric positioning jig (A). The carpal and metacarpal bones were encased in plastic resin with a positioning dowel. The radius and ulna were similarly encased. Radiopaque ceramic spherical markers were cemented to each of the component surfaces. Three typical slices of the hand from a CT volume image are shown in (B).
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The low standard deviation of rotation about and translation along the helical axis for different numbers and all possible combinations of spherical markers fixed to the specimen hand component indicates the validity of assuming the spheres moved as a rigid body. Rotation and translation values are shown for a typical motion. The mean and standard deviation values for three spheres in the translation along the helical axis were −24.5 mm and 24.5 mm, respectively (not plotted).
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Mean rotation and HAM orientation error plotted versus mean bone volume. The coefficient of determination (r2) is given for each plot. The volume standard deviation for all bones was less than 49 mm3. The standard deviation for error values are given in subsequent graphs.
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Mean rotation and HAM orientation errors are plotted versus the inertia magnitude ratio for the inertia technique. The inertia magnitude ratio is calculated using the second and third inertial principal axes for each bone. As the ratio approaches unity, bone shape approaches that of a cylinder. The inertia magnitude ratio standard deviation for all bones was less than 0.014. The standard deviation for kinematic error values are given in following graphs.
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The bones with the lowest and highest inertia magnitude ratios (hamate (H) and trapezoid (T), respectively) are rendered with principal inertia axes in two oblique views (A and C) and a palmar view (B)
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Mean (one standard deviation) difference between bone and sphere rotations for each technique
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Mean (one standard deviation) difference between bone and sphere translations for each technique
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Mean (one standard deviation) angle between bone and sphere helical axes for each technique
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Mean (one standard deviation) distance between bone and sphere helical axes for each technique

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