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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Simulation of Pressure Drop and Energy Dissipation for Blood Flow in a Human Fetal Bifurcation

[+] Author and Article Information
L. R. Hellevik

Department of Applied Mechanics, Thermodynamics, and Fluid Dynamics, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; National Center for Fetal Medicine, Trondheim, Norway

T. Kiserud

Unit of Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Bergen, Bergen, Norway

F. Irgens, T. Ytrehus

Department of Applied Mechanics, Thermodynamics, and Fluid Dynamics, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway

S. H. Eik-Nes

National Center for Fetal Medicine, Trondheim, Norway

J Biomech Eng 120(4), 455-462 (Aug 01, 1998) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2798014 History: Revised January 09, 1997; Received December 03, 1997; Online October 30, 2007

Abstract

The pressure drop from the umbilical vein to the heart plays a vital part in human fetal circulation. The bulk of the pressure drop is believed to take place at the inlet of the ductus venosus, a short narrow branch of the umbilical vein. In this study a generalized Bernoulli formulation was deduced to estimate this pressure drop. The model contains an energy dissipation term and flow-scaled velocities and pressures. The flow-scaled variables are related to their corresponding spatial mean velocities and pressures by certain shape factors. Further, based on physiological measurements, we established a simplified, rigid-walled, three-dimensional computational model of the umbilical vein and ductus venosus bifurcation for stationary flow conditions. Simulations were carried out for Reynolds numbers and umbilical vein curvature ratios in their respective physiological ranges. The shape factors in the Bernoulli formulation were then estimated for our computational models. They showed no significant Reynolds number or curvature ratio dependency. Further, the energy dissipation in our models was estimated to constitute 24 to 31 percent of the pressure drop, depending on the Reynolds number and the curvature ratio. The energy dissipation should therefore be taken into account in pressure drop estimates.

Copyright © 1998 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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