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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Development and Evaluation of a Musculoskeletal Model of the Elbow Joint Complex

[+] Author and Article Information
R. V. Gonzalez

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712

E. L. Hutchins

Biomedical Engineering Program, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712

R. E. Barr

Department of Mechanical Engineering; Biomedical Engineering Program, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712

L. D. Abraham

Biomedical Engineering Program; Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712

J Biomech Eng 118(1), 32-40 (Feb 01, 1996) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2795943 History: Received March 14, 1994; Revised December 16, 1994; Online October 30, 2007

Abstract

This paper describes the development and evaluation of a musculoskeletal model that represents human elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination. The length, velocity, and moment arm for each of the eight musculotendon actuators were based on skeletal anatomy and joint position. Musculotendon parameters were determined for each actuator and verified by comparing analytical moment-angle curves with experimental joint torque data. The parameters and skeletal geometry were also utilized in the musculoskeletal model for the analysis of ballistic (rapid-directed) elbow joint complex movements. The key objective was to develop a computational model, guided by parameterized optimal control, to investigate the relationship among patterns of muscle excitation, individual muscle forces, and to determine the effects of forearm and elbow position on the recruitment of individual muscles during a variety of ballistic movements. The model was partially verified using experimental kinematic, torque, and electromyographic data from volunteer subjects performing both isometric and ballistic elbow joint complex movements. This verification lends credibility to the time-varying muscle force predictions and the recruitment of muscles that contribute to both elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination.

Copyright © 1996 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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