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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Confined Compression of Canine Annulus Fibrosus Under Chemical and Mechanical Loading

[+] Author and Article Information
M. R. Drost

Department of Movement Sciences, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Eindhoven, The Netherlands

P. Willems, H. Snijders

Department of Movement Sciences, University of Limburg

J. M. Huyghe, J. D. Janssen, A. Huson

Department of Movement Sciences, University of Limburg and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Eindhoven

J Biomech Eng 117(4), 390-396 (Nov 01, 1995) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2794197 History: Received July 02, 1993; Revised October 19, 1994; Online October 30, 2007

Abstract

Uniaxial confined compression and swelling experiments on cylindrical specimens taken either in an axial or in a radial direction from a canine lumbar annulus fibrosus are presented. The loading protocol consisted of a combination of stepwise mechanical and chemical loading. Swelling and consolidation curves of normalized displacement versus square root of normalized time did not show a dependence on site or orientation of the specimen. All stages in which height increases, namely, conditioning, swelling, and desolidation show only slight differences in these normalized curves. Consolidation is initially faster, and later slower. The transport coefficient for axial specimens is higher than for radial specimens, for consolidation e.g., 3.14 ± 1.56 10−10 m2 s−1 and 1.11 ± 0.33 10−10 m2 s−1 respectively, the biphasic aggregate moduli are 1.01 ± 0.31 MPa and 0.66 ± 0.30 MPa, respectively.

Copyright © 1995 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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