0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

The Application of Scanning Acoustic Microscopy in a Bone Remodeling Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Sheu-Jane Shieh

Department of Orthopaedics, UMD-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103 and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854

M. C. Zimmerman

Department of Orthopaedics, UMD-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103

N. A. Langrana

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854

J Biomech Eng 117(3), 286-292 (Aug 01, 1995) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2794183 History: Received July 11, 1993; Revised July 30, 1994; Online October 30, 2007

Abstract

Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) was used in the evaluation of bone remodeling around a cylindrical unicortical defect. SAM is a technique for the nondestructive evaluation of materials, and has only recently been employed as an orthopaedic research tool. The utility of SAM was demonstrated by using it to measure an elastic property known as acoustic impedance. Specifically, the acoustic impedance of bone formed by remodeling around a cylindrical defect was measured. The defects were filled with either a low modulus “void” or rigid inclusion to create various states of stress in the bone in the vicinity of the defect. After six months of implantation of the inclusions in the sheep metatarsal, new bone formation on periosteal and endosteal surfaces about the defect region was observed. These regions of new bone were less stiff and had 18.0 ± 6.5% lower acoustic impedance than the pre-existing bone in the intracortical region of the metatarsal. There was no difference in the degree of new bone formation about void and rigid inclusions. Both underwent significant adaptational changes in response to the elevated stress about the defect. These changes affected the basic structure of the bone cross-section at the level of the defect and effectively reduced the stress levels about the defect. By using SAM to measure acoustic impedance, it was seen that little internal remodeling occurred in the intracortical region. Hence, the primary mechanism of strain-induced bone remodeling observed in this experimental model was surface remodeling.

Copyright © 1995 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In