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RESEARCH PAPERS: Additional Research Papers

Contact Stress Gradient Detection Limits of Pressensor Film

[+] Author and Article Information
J. E. Hale, T. D. Brown

Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242

J Biomech Eng 114(3), 352-357 (Aug 01, 1992) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2891395 History: Received April 25, 1990; Revised December 13, 1991; Online March 17, 2008

Abstract

Fuji Pressensor film has been widely used for measurement of contact stresses in articular joints. In relatively smooth contact fields, measurement errors are reported to be in the range of approximately 10-15 percent. However, when local incongruities exist, strong contact stress gradients are present. This study investigates the film’s capability to accurately transduce such gradients. Standardized stress distributions were produced by compressing the film between a rigid cylinder and an elastic layer supported by a rigid substrate. Seven different cylinder radii were used to obtain a range of gradient magnitudes. The resulting stains were digitized, and the contact stress gradients assessed by image analysis. Experimentally detected gradients were compared with those predicted analytically. The film’s capability to reliably transduce contact stress gradients was shown to be sufficient for usage in the study of typical local articular incongruities.

Copyright © 1992 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Stress , Cylinders , Errors
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