0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Heat Generation in Laser Irradiated Tissue

[+] Author and Article Information
A. J. Welch

Department of Electric and Computer Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Program, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712

J. A. Pearce, G. Yoon, W. F. Cheong

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Program, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712

K. R. Diller

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Program, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712

J Biomech Eng 111(1), 62-68 (Feb 01, 1989) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3168341 History: Received July 29, 1987; Revised December 08, 1988; Online June 12, 2009

Abstract

Many medical applications involving lasers rely upon the generation of heat within the tissue for the desired therapeutic effect. Determination of the absorbed light energy in tissue is difficult in many cases. Although UV wavelengths of the excimer laser and 10.6 μm wavelength of the CO2 laser are absorbed within the first 20 μm of soft tissue, visible and near infrared wavelengths are scattered as well as absorbed. Typically, multiple scattering is a significant factor in the distribution of light in tissue and the resulting heat source term. An improved model is presented for estimating heat generation due to the absorption of a collimated (axisymmetric) laser beam and scattered light at each point r and z in tissue. Heat generated within tissue is a function of the laser power, the shape and size of the incident beam and the optical properties of the tissue at the irradiation wavelength. Key to the calculation of heat source strength is accurate estimation of the light distribution. Methods for experimentally determining the optical parameters of tissue are discussed in the context of the improved model.

Copyright © 1989 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In