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RESEARCH PAPERS

Effect of Timing and Velocity of Impact on Ventricular Myocardial Rupture

[+] Author and Article Information
Ian V. Lau

Biomedical Science Department, General Motors Research Laboratories, Warren, Mich. 48090

J Biomech Eng 105(1), 1-5 (Feb 01, 1983) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3138378 History: Received October 15, 1981; Revised July 12, 1982; Online June 15, 2009

Abstract

The effects of impact timing during the cardiac cycle on the sensitivity of the heart to impact-induced rupture was investigated in an open-chest animal model. Direct mechanical impacts were applied to two adjacent sites on the exposed left ventricular surface at the end of systole or diastole. Impacts at 5 m/s and a contact stroke of 5 cm at the end of systole resulted in no cardiac rupture in seven animals, whereas similar impacts at the end of diastole resulted in six cardiac ruptures. Direct impact at 15 m/s and a contact stroke of 2 cm at the end of either systole or diastole resulted in perforationlike cardiac rupture in all attempts. At low-impact velocity the heart was observed in high-speed movie to bounce away from the impact interface during a systolic impact, but deform around the impactor during a diastolic impact. The heart generally remained motionless during the downward impact stroke at high-impact velocity in either a systolic or diastolic impact. The lower ventricular pressure, reduced muscle stiffness, thinner myocardial wall and larger mass of the filled ventricle probably contributed to a greater sensitivity of the heart to rupture in diastole at low-impact velocity. However, the same factors had no role at high-impact velocity.

Copyright © 1983 by ASME
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