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RESEARCH PAPERS

A Proposed Model of Boundary Lubrication by Synovial Fluid: Structuring of Boundary Water

[+] Author and Article Information
W. H. Davis

Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Pathology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, N.Y. 11794; Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, N.Y.

S. L. Lee

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Pathology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, N.Y. 11794

L. Sokoloff

Health Sciences Center, Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Pathology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, N.Y. 11794

J Biomech Eng 101(3), 185-192 (Aug 01, 1979) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3426243 History: Received November 20, 1978; Online October 21, 2010

Abstract

On the basis of data obtained from in-vitro friction tests using both cartilage and widely differing artificial surfaces, a general model for boundary lubrication of joint cartilage by synovial fluid is presented. It postulates that one portion of the synovial lubricating glycoprotein (LGP) is adsorbed to the surface. Reduction in surface shear is accomplished by formation of hydration shells about the polar portions of the adsorbed LGP creating a thin layer of viscous structured water at the surface. Mutual electrostatic repulsion between charged polysaccharide moieties aids in separation of the adsorbed surface layers. The hydration shell also serves as a check valve to control the movement of water out of and into the cartilage matrix during motion.

Copyright © 1979 by ASME
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