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Research Papers

An Experimental and Numerical Study of Hybrid III Dummy Response to Simulated Underbody Blast Impacts

[+] Author and Article Information
Karthik Somasundaram

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Wayne State University,
818 W Hancock Avenue,
Detroit, MI 48201
e-mail: Karthiksomubme@gmail.com

Anil Kalra

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Wayne State University,
818 W Hancock Avenue,
Detroit, MI 48201
e-mail: anil.kalra@wayne.edu

Don Sherman

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Wayne State University,
818 W Hancock Avenue,
Detroit, MI 48201
e-mail: Donald.sherman@wayne.edu

Paul Begeman

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Wayne State University,
818 W Hancock Avenue,
Detroit, MI 48201
e-mail: Begeman@wayne.edu

King H. Yang

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Wayne State University,
818 W Hancock Avenue,
Detroit, MI 48201
e-mail: aa0007@wayne.edu

John Cavanaugh

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Wayne State University,
818 W Hancock Avenue,
Detroit, MI 48201
e-mail: jmc@wayne.edu

Manuscript received November 20, 2016; final manuscript received August 11, 2017; published online September 28, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Joel D. Stitzel.

J Biomech Eng 139(12), 121002 (Sep 28, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: BIO-16-1468; doi: 10.1115/1.4037591 History: Received November 20, 2016; Revised August 11, 2017

Anthropometric test devices (ATDs) such as the Hybrid III dummy have been widely used in automotive crash tests to evaluate the risks of injury at different body regions. In recent years, researchers have started using automotive ATDs to study the high-speed vertical loading response caused by underbody blast impacts. This study analyzed the Hybrid III dummy responses to short-duration, large magnitude vertical accelerations in a laboratory setup. Two unique test conditions were investigated using a horizontal sled system to simulate underbody blast loading conditions. The biomechanical responses in terms of pelvis acceleration, chest acceleration, lumbar spine force, head accelerations, and neck forces were measured. Subsequently, a series of finite element (FE) analyses were performed to simulate the physical tests. The correlation between the Hybrid III test and numerical model was evaluated using the correlation and analysis (cora) version 3.6.1. The score for the Wayne State University (WSU) FE model was 0.878 and 0.790 for loading conditions 1 and 2, respectively, in which 1.0 indicated a perfect correlation between the experiment and the simulated response. With repetitive vertical impacts, the Hybrid III dummy pelvis showed a significant increase in peak acceleration accompanied by a rupture of the pelvis foam and flesh. The revised WSU Hybrid III model indicated high stress concentrations at the same location, providing a possible explanation for the material failure in actual Hybrid III tests.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Lateral view of the horizontal sled system with the occupant positioned on the seat with a five-point belt

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

(a) Comparison between the FE and physical Hybrid III sled setups. (b) and (c) The pelvis and foot of the FE model and physical ATD contact with the seat and floor plate, respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Floor and seat acceleration curve for the five consecutive tests for condition 1 (above) and condition 2 (below)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

The biomechanical responses in terms of the pelvis/chest/head acceleration and the upper neck/tibia force for loading conditions 1 and 2 are shown in the left and right columns, respectively. The last graph in the series depicts the lumbar spine load for loading condition 2.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Comparisons of the WSU Hybrid III dummy model-predicted and physical test measured impact responses for impact condition 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Comparison of the WSU Hybrid III dummy model-predicted and physical test measured impact response for impact condition 2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

(a) An isometric view of the different components of the FE pelvis model with pelvis flesh and foam removed from the right side. (b) Side view of FE pelvis captured at t = 0 ms and t = 11 ms, respectively. (c) The location of the pelvis flesh rupture observed in the post test Hybrid III dummy for loading condition 2 coincided with the location where the FE model predicted maximum principal stresses would be found. The image below shows the corresponding pelvis foam stress map.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Comparisons of the Hybrid III test 1 relative response with consecutive test data, separated by each loading condition

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Hourglass energy measured by original pelvis flesh and updated pelvis flesh model, respectively

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